Collaborative Project # 8: Immunologic checkpoint blockade and adoptive cell transfer in cancer therapy

Collaborative Project # 8: Immunologic checkpoint blockade and adoptive cell transfer in cancer therapy

Collaborating Investigator: Dr. Michel Sadelain Affiliation: Director, Center for Cell Engineering; Professor, Immunology Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Funding Source: Stand Up to Cancer Grant Number: n/a Project Period: 07/01/07-06/30/20 Project Status: New Significance This collaboration will enable us to translate our findings regarding immunometabolism to this novel treatment modality for cancer. Aim 1 seeks to exploit the robust molecular biology of CAR T cell generation and T cell genome editing to make these cells more…

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Collaborative Project # 7: Regional oncology research center

Collaborating Investigator: Dr. Ivan Borrello Affiliation: Associate Professor of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Funding Source: Regional oncology research center Grant Number: NIH P30CA006973 Project Period: 05/01/17-04/30/22 Project Status: New Significance In multiple myeloma (and many other heme- and non heme malignancies), the bone marrow is enriched for cancer specific T cells. Moreover, the higher efficiency of antigen presentation and greater concentration of central memory T cells in the marrow, make MILs a…

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Collaborative Project #6: Controlled release system for immunoregulation and treatment of periodontal disease

Collaborating Investigator: Steven Little Affiliation: University of Pittsburgh Funding Source: NIH Grant Number: U24DE026915 Project Period: 03/01/17-02/29/20 Project Status: New Significance Periodontal disease affects over 78 million Americans and is considered the most pressing oral health concern today. Also known as periodontitis, this condition is characterized by destructive inflammation of the periodontium, including the gum tissue, supporting bone, and ligament. Importantly, this disease affects not only tooth loss, but also the incidence of cardiovascular disease,…

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Collaborative Project #5: Harnessing biomaterials to study the link between local lymph node function and systemic tolerance

Collaborating Investigator: Christopher Jewell Affiliation: University of Maryland Funding Source: NIH Grant Number: R01EB026896 Project Period: 04/03/18-12/31/21 Project Status: New Significance During autoimmune disease, the body incorrectly identifies “self” molecules as foreign and mounts a chronic immune attack. Conventional therapies employ broad immunosuppression, which has provided significant benefits to patients, but can leave these individuals immunocompromised. This limitation, along with the lack of cures for most autoimmune diseases, has sparked intense interest in strategies that…

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Collaborative Project # 4: Myeloid-dervived suppressor cells in checkpoint protein inhibition for melanoma

Collaborating Investigator: Jeffrey Weber, M.D., Ph.D Affiliation: NYU Langone Medical Center Funding Source: DOD Grant Number: RM1CA150630 Project Period: 09/01/16-08/31/19 Project Status: New Significance In this proposal, we wish to demonstrate the feasibility of identifying and expanding neoantigen-specific T cells for adoptive transfer following PD-1 blockade, in order to show that the majority of patients can have melanoma neoantigen-specific T cells expanded from their peripheral blood. We also aim to optimize ex vivo conditions for…

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Collaborative Project #3: Modeling HIV rebound role of SIVMAC251 functional reservoirs and biomarkers of reactivation

Collaborating Investigator: Robert Siliciano Affiliation: Professor of Medicine Investigator, HHMI Member NAS Johns Hopkins SOM Funding source: NIH GrantNumber: P01AI131306 Project period: 06/23/17-05/31/22 Significance Certain HIV-infected individuals, known as “elite suppressors,” are able to maintain undetectable viral loads without antiretroviral therapy. In effect, their immune responses to the virus induce a functional cure. Current efforts in HIV research seek to develop vaccines that can achieve this same kind of functional cure in all patients. One…

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