Service Project # 6: Paracrine interactions during cardiac and endothelial co-differentiation of HPSCS

Service Project # 6: Paracrine interactions during cardiac and endothelial co-differentiation of HPSCS

Collaborating Investigator: Sean Palecek Affiliation: University of Wisconsin – Madison Funding Status: NIH R01EB007534 Project Period: 07/01/07-11/30/19 Summary The overall goal of SP #6 is to develop a FACS-based system to interrogate metabolic status of cells. This SP will not develop any novel technology but rather push novel approaches to examining metabolic programming of cells using already technology. This FACS-based “individual” cell analysis will be developed (push) to interrogate cardiac HPSCS. Specific Aim 1. Create…

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Service Project # 5: Biomaterials-based germinal center niches for understanding the B cell maturation and B cell receptor signaling

Collaborating Investigator: Ankur Singh Affiliation: Cornell University Funding Status: NIH R01AI132738 Project Period: 02/09/18-01/31/23 Summary The goal of SP#5 is engineering designer organoids with tunable ligand specificities, understanding antigen specific immune response, and establishing a link between integrin ligand specificity and cell cycle epigenetics of germinal center reaction. NIM technologies from TR&D2 and metabolic reprogramming approaches from TR&D3 will be transferred (push) to Dr. Singh so that he can utilize these technologies to better achieve…

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Service Project #4: Therapeutic peptide for hepatocellular carcinoma

Collaborating Investigator: Niranjan Pandey Affiliation: AsclepiX Therapeutics Funding: NIH 1R43CA232947 Project Period: 09/01/18-08/31/19 Summary There are very limited options currently available for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of liver cancer. HCC, like most forms of cancer, is dependent on angiogenesis, the growth of blood vessels. These and other tumors use VEGF and Ang2 to induce angiogenesis. The tumor also uses these factors to suppress the immune system. Anti-VEGF agents inhibit…

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Service Project #3: Development of polymeric nanoparticles for regulating stem cell differentiation and improving direct reprogramming

Collaborating Investigator: Seung-Woo Cho Affiliation: Yonsei University, Korea Funding Status: National Research Foundation (NRF) of Kore Project Period: 03/01/17-02/28/20 Summary Pluripotent reprogramming and direct lineage reprogramming hold tremendous potential as powerful strategies for providing alternative autologous cell sources for cell therapeutics and disease modelling. Target lineage cells can be derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) or directly converted from human fibroblasts for cell therapy and tissue engineering. Using cellular reprogramming technology, disease models…

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Service Project # 2: Enhancement of adoptive cell therapy by oncolytic vaccines

Collaborating Investigator: Yonghong Wan Affiliation: McMaster University, Ontario, Canada Funding Source: Canadian Cancer Society Project Period: 08/01/17-07/31/20 Summary The goal of SP #2 is to establish new approaches for ex vivo expansion of circulating endogenous antigen-specific T cells for oncolytic immunotherapy. We will push TR&D1 optimized aAPC for expansion of tumor-specific T cells that Dr. Wan will study in their models of oncolytic virus therapy. Specific Aim 1. Delivering a protocol that allows local manufacturing…

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Service Project # 1: Optimization of artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs) in pre-clinical models

Collaborating Investigator: Scott Carmer Affiliation: CEO – NexImmune, Inc. Gaithersburg, MD Funding Status: Neximmune, Inc. Project Period: 01/01/18-12/31/20 Summary The goal of SP #1 is to synthesize and validate artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) in preclinical AML models. For SP #1, we will push our engineered optimized aAPC, from SA1, for expansion of human CD8+ T cells which will be tested by NexImmune using their proprietary AML-specific antigens as well as shared AML antigens. In…

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